These female content creators put the 'you' in YouTube

These female content creators put the 'you' in YouTube

“I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” - Maya Angelou

This is the quote that has stuck with Audrey Luguterah for years when dealing with personal insecurities, doubts and fears. Now at 22, the Whitby woman has found her voice through her YouTube channel Nascent Audrey” where she touches on topics covering life lessons, advice and her spiritual faith. Her channel is about the journey to “becoming who God has called us to be”.

“This means operating at our best, to our fullest capacity. Pumped and armed with full understanding of who we are in Christ. That's a journey that can take a lifetime to uncover, I try to show a little of mine,” Luguterah said.

AUDREY LUGUTERAH, 22, IN TORONTO.  Photo courtesy of Audrey Luguterah

AUDREY LUGUTERAH, 22, IN TORONTO. Photo courtesy of Audrey Luguterah

“I personally did not feel like I had a welcoming environment that encouraged me to be just me,” she said. “ I created a YouTube channel because it was something that I could have for myself and I could do or be whoever and whatever I wanted.”

“I created a YouTube channel because it was something that I could have for myself and I could do or be whoever and whatever I wanted.”

Luguterah’s goal is to create a space online that is authentic and “displays the journey of a very flawed, imperfect person trying to do her best.”

With that, she set on her journey to bring self-awareness to those around her, but more importantly, to herself.

YouTube is increasingly seeing a stronger female presence. Big-time female creators like Bethany Mota and Liza Koshy, are among a few who are at the top of their game with millions of subscribers behind them. Earlier this year, YouTube’s head of business, Robert Kyncl, announced that he would like to see more female creators on the platform.

The internet is a very public space that has connected so many people to each other and has even catapulted the careers of many. However, there are some dark sides to it because such a public platform can make room for hatred and backlash.

“Sadly, it’s also a space where people you don't even know can comment or do whatever they want with what you decided to share publicly,” Luguterah said.

MONAE, (LEFT) AND AMY (RIGHT), ARE THE CREATORS OF “THE YELLOW ROOM” ON YOUTUBE.  Photo courtesy of Amy Says

MONAE, (LEFT) AND AMY (RIGHT), ARE THE CREATORS OF “THE YELLOW ROOM” ON YOUTUBE. Photo courtesy of Amy Says

Toronto YouTube duo and friends Monae Sayid and Amy Says have a solution for deterring people from commenting on their appearance on their platform. Their channel is calledThe Yellow Room” where they talk about spirituality and give advice on personal growth. The two women also wear yellow coloured sweaters with their logo printed on it during every episode. According to them, this keeps the focus of their viewers on their content and personality rather than what outfits their wearing.

“As females we have a lot of expectations put on us, from the way we look to how much we weigh,” Says said. “It’s difficult putting ourselves out there as Muslim women who talk about spirituality. You should be politically and religiously conscious when speaking.”

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